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Is this a new trend? I hope not.

In the article, Son Files Harassment Charges Against Mother for Facebook Posts, “Denise New’s 16-year-old son filed charges against her…after he claims she posted slanderous entries about him on the social networking site. New says she was just trying to monitor what he was posting.”

Are there legal rights that a parent or child have in this situation? I believe that minors should be monitored in the social media space. If they are taught to post appropriate material at a young age, it seems they would be less likely to post inappropriate things to the internet later in life.

“In a document from the Clark County prosecutor, [New’s son] alleges she hacked his account, changed his password and posted things that involve slander about his personal life.” Arkansas’ harassment law states that harassment occurs when “A person commits the offense if with purpose to harass, annoy or alarm another person without good cause, he engages in conduct or repeatedly commits acts that alarm or seriously annoy another person.”

New says she “read things on his Facebook about how he had gone to Hot Springs one night and was driving 95 m.p.h. home because he was upset with a girl and it was his friend that called me and told me about all this that prompted me to even actually start really going through his Facebook to see what was going on.” After brushing up on my Arkansas geography, Arkadelphia to Hot Springs is just under an hour drive. I’ve read before that it can be more dangerous to drive tired or upset than driving drunk, so I don’t blame Denise for trying to get some more information on this joy ride.

New isn’t going to give up. “Oh yeah, I’m going to fight it. If I have to go even higher up, I’m going to. I’m not gonna let this rest. I think this could be a precedent-setting moment for parents.” Good luck Denise, win this for the worried parents of the world.

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Dear Rad Tattoo Getter,

Please wait until the gel, puss, blood, scrapes and scabs are gone before posting your macho tattoo pictures. Those of us who are afraid of needles might find them interesting if you can wait until that point.

Thanks,

Everyone

There is a time and a place for abbreviations. Sometimes, abbrev’s are funny, other times they’re convenient. However, usually they are annoying, unnecessary and insincere. Abbreviating a post or a text when you are nowhere near the word limit is pure laziness.

Some of my biggest pet peeves are the most commonly used abbreviations…

  • Thx: You really seem thankful. (Note the facetious tone in my voice.)
  • Sry: I do not forgive you. I would rather you throw dirt in my face.
  • Pls: The answer is no. Do not bother asking again.
  • Xmas: No comment.
  • Luv: Thanks for demonstrating your undying passion. I probably love you less after receiving this.

When a message is getting to its limit, the first change you should make is to eliminate unnecessary words, then switch and’s to &’s. If it is still multiple characters over, and the information is important, send two messages.

My friend Kelly’s Gmail status: “Thank you, Facebook & TFLN for helping me see exactly how horrible 75% of the people in this country are at spelling.” She went on to say, “I am so irritated. I just want to say COME ON PEOPLE YOU WENT TO COLLEGE. Your vs. You’re is an elementary school distinction.”

This is one of my biggest pet peeves. Don’t get me wrong, I am not perfect when it comes to grammar, punctuation and spelling. That said, there are many things that people could catch if they just took 15 seconds to review what they have written. People have stopped taking the time to do this.

Below I am going to list a few common mistakes, after reading this post, please don’t make them.

  • Your vs. You’re
  • There vs. They’re vs. Their
  • To vs. Too vs. Two
  • It’s vs. Its
  • Neither/Nor vs. Either/Or

Celtic Inc., a communications company in Brookfield Wisconsin, blogged today about the New Oxford American Dictionary’s 2009 “word of the year” and it’s a social media term: Unfriend. ‘Unfriend’ is defined as a verb which means “to remove somebody as a ‘friend’ from a social networking site like Facebook.

I’m not sure what our society is coming to that the concept of ‘unfriending’ is the word of the year. Here’s my word to the wise: if there’s a chance the person you unfriend will find out that you unfriended them, you might want to just add them to your ‘limited profile’ list or remove their ‘updates’ from your ‘news feed’.

In this article some Facebook Etiquette Rules that people still forget are outlined. Please don’t forget them.

A summary of the faux pas: Pregnant cryptic private countdowns calling crazy awful colleagues instead of calling people you aren’t friends with, is application overload.


I am the biggest fan of ‘status updates’. I love Facebook and I love Twitter. However, TMI is TMI. There are ‘comments’ that scream “elephant in the room” and ‘status updates’ that whisper “awkward turtle”. Let’s try to keep those to a minimum.

“Facebook etiquette rule #853,653: Do not write the details of your miscarriage in your Facebook status.” -VanidYam, aka: Amy Davin.

Your ‘friends’ thank you in advance for following this rule.

[*The t-shirt above is available for purchase at this website.]

On family road trips chaos always ensued.  Do you remember the “I’m not touching you” game? Let me refresh your memory, without actually making physical contact, one sibling makes a poking motion as close to another sibling as possible. If you’re on the receiving end, this game is annoying. This game is the live version of Facebook ‘poking’.

Facebook ‘poking’ is a strange phenomenon. The biggest issue with poking is that different people perceive it to mean different things, including but not limited to: joking, flirting or just saying hello. Personally, I would prefer for one to just make an actual joke, actually flirt (preferably in person) or actually say hello. This would avoid the drama of debating if I am going to ‘poke back’ or ‘remove’ the poke.

Also, if someone has a restraining order against you, I wouldn’t poke that person. Need a reason? Read this article.


People are always in a hurry and they want information quickly. Sites that provide a quick laugh are on the rise. Sites that achieve this goal are: FML (F##k My Life), Fail, MLIA (My Life Is Average), TFLN (Texts From Last Night) & AFP (Awkward Family Photos). Lamebook has joined this group of quickies to point out the faux pas people commit on the Facebook.

I suggest you visit the Lamebook the next time you get annoyed with poor Facebook Etiquette, it will make you feel better to know that you’re not the only one left with common sense.

If you can’t say anything nice, don’t say anything at all. Do not make rude ‘comments’ on Facebook. It isolates people, hurts feelings and ruins fun.

What do I mean by rude comments? Here is the scenario: If you ‘comment on a ‘photo’, a ‘note’ or an individual’s ‘post’, even if you are ‘tagged’, you relinquish your right to make negative comments. Examples include but are not limited to: “I’m sorry you (referring to others involved in the posting) had to witness this”, “You are blowing up my inbox”, “Take it to a wall”. You get the point.

At any given time one can ‘untag’, delete their ‘comment’ or ‘unlike’.  While I personally think doing any of those three things is unsportsmanlike, it is bad etiquette to make a rude comment.

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