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Just like video killed the radio star, Jay Baer has proclaimed that Facebook has killed websites. Is it true? Maybe. Polls (both national and among my contacts) confirm that people check their email and Twitter/Facebook feeds first thing in the morning and many times throughout the day. It is impossible to individually check every interesting website and to read every relevant article.

With 500 million members and counting, Facebook turns that equation on its head. Like the walled garden of the original AOL, Facebook can make the case that they already have access to all of your customers, so why wouldn’t you want to just ride their coattails? If there is a killer party with tons of people, a great band, and free booze it’s going to be tough to get a couple dozen people to leave to come over to your house to watch Jimmy Kimmel and eat microwave popcorn.

Jay has a point. (Though my friend Sabrina won around $20,000 on Wheel of Fortune because she watched Jimmy Kimmel the night before she went on the show.) Facebook has collected a tremendous amount of data on each user. From birthdays, email addresses and hometowns to groups, pages and things that you ‘like’ and the status updates you post, they know you inside and out. Additionally, there are more and more ways to connect your Facebook page to sites upon logging in, ‘liking’ and ‘sharing’. Think about it, Facebook probably knows things about you that your parents and closest friends don’t know, unless they comb your profile.

Personally, I think companies that ignore social media, especially Facebook, are missing out. They are missing out on customer interactions and true engagement. They are missing out on free feedback and quality reviews.

What do you think?

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With articles like this on Mashable every other day, I figured I’d ask what you think about the Facebook privacy issues.
Do you care if your information is shared? What’s the difference between that information that is available to anyone vs. your friends? What is the difference among the various networks, like Twitter, Linkedin and MySpace, and their privacy settings?

Your commentary is appreciated.

Word of mouth and a Facebook event triggered thousands of New Jersey high school students to participate in a walkout yesterday. The event’s current attendance is over 18,000.

According to the Mashable article, “The event was organized by 18-year-old Michelle Ryan Lauto — a Pace University student who once attended high school in New Jersey. Lauto decided to take action after Governor Chris Christie announced that he would be cutting $820 million in educational funding for next year, according to the Hartford Courant.”

It’s great to see social media bringing such a large group of people together for a cause. Many people say that today’s youth are apathetic and self concerned but this proves otherwise.

Check out footage of the protest:

Mine is. Something makes me think that these rockers have moms on Facebook too…

I came across this video via @Mashable.

Just came across this Mashable Article, “Social Media Dorks Get An Anthem [VIDEO]“. I am officially a ‘new dork’. Since you’re reading this ‘Facebook Etiquette’ blog, you probably are too. Check it out.

I came across the Please Rob Me site a few days ago. I don’t use Foursquare, so I felt that Please Rob Me wasn’t relevant to me. However, a friend sent me this article and I’ve given the general concept some more thought.

In case I’m speaking in Pig Latin, I am referring to status updates. When you send an update, you are letting the World Wide Web know what you are doing. In the case of Foursquare and Please Rob Me, you are letting the WWW know that you are not home.

I love status updates and will continue to send I’m not home type updates. However, I do this knowing that I do not live alone and I have a doorman, three locked doors and at least five security cameras between outside and my apartment. If you live in a less-secure situation, you might reconsider broadcasting your empty home to the world.

From the Your Facebook profile: An open invite to crime? article, “Posting ‘My big-screen TV is awesome, wish someone was gonna be home enjoying it, but everyone’s gone for three days’ isn’t the brightest move in the world,” says this one police officer I know from Facebook.”


This article compares the top trends for 2009 on Facebook and Twitter. The fact that Lady Gaga didn’t make the Twitter list and Michael Jackson didn’t make the Facebook list is astonishing to me but the article is far more fascinating than the lists of topics. The article reminds me of the difference between Facebook and Twitter.

I have said before that Facebook is a place for you to connect with people you actually know. For this reason, on Facebook, the exchange is personal. Simply put, Twitter is an information exchange. Twitter has greater search capabilities and less privacy options [than Facebook] so they have the ability to gather more information. I do not care if you know all of the people you ‘follow’  on Twitter and vice versa.

I like it like this.

If The Real World Was Like Facebook: A user-created photo contest created by Cracked.

Because “Facebook is full of behavior that would get you punched in the real world.”

There is a time and a place for abbreviations. Sometimes, abbrev’s are funny, other times they’re convenient. However, usually they are annoying, unnecessary and insincere. Abbreviating a post or a text when you are nowhere near the word limit is pure laziness.

Some of my biggest pet peeves are the most commonly used abbreviations…

  • Thx: You really seem thankful. (Note the facetious tone in my voice.)
  • Sry: I do not forgive you. I would rather you throw dirt in my face.
  • Pls: The answer is no. Do not bother asking again.
  • Xmas: No comment.
  • Luv: Thanks for demonstrating your undying passion. I probably love you less after receiving this.

When a message is getting to its limit, the first change you should make is to eliminate unnecessary words, then switch and’s to &’s. If it is still multiple characters over, and the information is important, send two messages.

My friend Kelly’s Gmail status: “Thank you, Facebook & TFLN for helping me see exactly how horrible 75% of the people in this country are at spelling.” She went on to say, “I am so irritated. I just want to say COME ON PEOPLE YOU WENT TO COLLEGE. Your vs. You’re is an elementary school distinction.”

This is one of my biggest pet peeves. Don’t get me wrong, I am not perfect when it comes to grammar, punctuation and spelling. That said, there are many things that people could catch if they just took 15 seconds to review what they have written. People have stopped taking the time to do this.

Below I am going to list a few common mistakes, after reading this post, please don’t make them.

  • Your vs. You’re
  • There vs. They’re vs. Their
  • To vs. Too vs. Two
  • It’s vs. Its
  • Neither/Nor vs. Either/Or

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