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I came across the Please Rob Me site a few days ago. I don’t use Foursquare, so I felt that Please Rob Me wasn’t relevant to me. However, a friend sent me this article and I’ve given the general concept some more thought.

In case I’m speaking in Pig Latin, I am referring to status updates. When you send an update, you are letting the World Wide Web know what you are doing. In the case of Foursquare and Please Rob Me, you are letting the WWW know that you are not home.

I love status updates and will continue to send I’m not home type updates. However, I do this knowing that I do not live alone and I have a doorman, three locked doors and at least five security cameras between outside and my apartment. If you live in a less-secure situation, you might reconsider broadcasting your empty home to the world.

From the Your Facebook profile: An open invite to crime? article, “Posting ‘My big-screen TV is awesome, wish someone was gonna be home enjoying it, but everyone’s gone for three days’ isn’t the brightest move in the world,” says this one police officer I know from Facebook.”

The Vourlis twins awoke on the morning of their 20th birthday and logged on to Facebook, expecting messages from friends but instead discovered the horrific news about the accident that had taken their brother’s life the night before. My condolences to the Vourlis family, the Naylor family and the Coleman family.

Read the Daily Telegraph article here.

Read the CNET article here.

Read the Mashable article here.

If there is a baby in your Facebook ‘profile photo’, I will assume it is your baby. All of your ‘friends’ will too. We might stalk you for a few minutes to verify the facts and find out how pregnant you got.

(*This t-shirt is available for purchase here.)


This article, by Mark Walsh, is about brands transitioning their ‘fan pages’ to storefronts.

‘”Social media is rapidly becoming a critically important vehicle for talking with our customers. Now, with our new iFanStore, we’ve opened up an entirely new sales channel for our seasonal, specialty blends,” said Helen Russell, CEO and co-founder of San Rafael, Calif.-based Equator, in a statement.’

The one thing this article doesn’t mention is the Facebook Marketplace. People have always connected on Facebook. Over time, people started connecting to their favorite brands on Facebook. People also started buying, selling and trading things on the Facebook Marketplace. It would have surprised me if these actions did not converge.

After giving it some thought, I am okay with brands using Facebook as a point of sale. I just hope that those brands don’t lose sight of Facebook’s roots – their first job is to connect with their consumers. Quality interactions with their fans will gain more sales in the end.

‘”What’s often ignored is whether the commercialization of Facebook will hurt its social feel,” said Shiv Singh, vice president and global social media lead at Razorfish.

He suggested that e-commerce activities should be presented in ways that don’t intrude on the conversational flow of Facebook. The success of an e-commerce venture via a Facebook page also depends on the product being sold. “I wouldn’t buy a car from within Facebook but I might buy a T-shirt,” said Singh. Or a pound of coffee?’

If The Real World Was Like Facebook: A user-created photo contest created by Cracked.

Because “Facebook is full of behavior that would get you punched in the real world.”

There is a time and a place for abbreviations. Sometimes, abbrev’s are funny, other times they’re convenient. However, usually they are annoying, unnecessary and insincere. Abbreviating a post or a text when you are nowhere near the word limit is pure laziness.

Some of my biggest pet peeves are the most commonly used abbreviations…

  • Thx: You really seem thankful. (Note the facetious tone in my voice.)
  • Sry: I do not forgive you. I would rather you throw dirt in my face.
  • Pls: The answer is no. Do not bother asking again.
  • Xmas: No comment.
  • Luv: Thanks for demonstrating your undying passion. I probably love you less after receiving this.

When a message is getting to its limit, the first change you should make is to eliminate unnecessary words, then switch and’s to &’s. If it is still multiple characters over, and the information is important, send two messages.

My friend Kelly’s Gmail status: “Thank you, Facebook & TFLN for helping me see exactly how horrible 75% of the people in this country are at spelling.” She went on to say, “I am so irritated. I just want to say COME ON PEOPLE YOU WENT TO COLLEGE. Your vs. You’re is an elementary school distinction.”

This is one of my biggest pet peeves. Don’t get me wrong, I am not perfect when it comes to grammar, punctuation and spelling. That said, there are many things that people could catch if they just took 15 seconds to review what they have written. People have stopped taking the time to do this.

Below I am going to list a few common mistakes, after reading this post, please don’t make them.

  • Your vs. You’re
  • There vs. They’re vs. Their
  • To vs. Too vs. Two
  • It’s vs. Its
  • Neither/Nor vs. Either/Or

Check out this article, where a man and his wife update their Facebook ‘Relationship Status’ and Twitter Status from the altar.

“…Before these witnesses and more importantly, before Almighty God. I now pronounce you husband and wife, what God has joined together – let no one separate. (Man reaches for pocket and pulls out a mobile device.) Dana is updating his relationship status on Facebook. (Hands second device to wife.) As I was saying, I now pronounce you husband and wife. It’s official on Facebook, it’s official in my book. Dana, you may kiss your bride.” -The Minister

The birthday section on your Facebook ‘homepage’ should be something you check frequently. Facebook has made it far less acceptable to forget, or God forbid completely miss, a birthday. I suggest going to each of your good friends’ Facebook pages and writing their birthdays in your personal calendar at the beginning of every year.

There are some friends with whom you are (basically) only in contact via Facebook – those friends are people who you can get away with only ‘wall postings’. You should still send your good friends and family members cards, or see them in person (what a novel thought) to celebrate the occasion.

The Facebook ‘wall’, is open for business all year-round. It amuses me when a ‘Wall-to-Wall’ is only birthday wishes. One way to remedy this situation is to personally ‘thank-post’ people who ‘birthday-post’ you. It takes more than a minute to do this but it is worth it. People will be happy or happily surprised that you ‘posted’ them back, nobody will think to themselves, “crap, so and so ‘posted’ on my ‘wall'” if they took the time to ‘birthday-post’ on your ‘wall’.

I recently had a birthday, which got me thinking about this topic. I also came across this conversation.  For the record, I think it is okay to white lie if you only remembered a person’s birthday because of Facebook…at least you didn’t forget.

I would like to dedicate this post to my three Facebook friends with birthdays today: Laura, Craig and Lydia.

In this article some Facebook Etiquette Rules that people still forget are outlined. Please don’t forget them.

A summary of the faux pas: Pregnant cryptic private countdowns calling crazy awful colleagues instead of calling people you aren’t friends with, is application overload.

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